Stewart-Winter Syllabus Fall 2011

INTRODUCTION TO LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, & TRANSGENDER STUDIES

21:988:205

Class Meeting Times: Tuesdays & Thursdays, 4-5:20PM

Class Location: Hill 103

Professor Timothy Stewart-Winter

Office: 314 Conklin Hall

Office Hours: Tuesdays, 1-3PM

Email: timsw@andromeda.rutgers.edu

This is an introductory course in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies. Major topics will

include the structural elements shaping LGBT lives, culture, politics, and contemporary controversies. Drawing

on readings by scholars, journalists, activists, and others, we will examine the emergence and construction of the

category “LGBT” as an umbrella term, emphasizing the way it is always mediated by race, gender, class, and

other forms of social power. Students in the course will also attend the conference “Queer Newark: Our Lives,

Our Histories,” on Saturday, November 12 on campus (see http://queer.newark.rutgers.edu for information).

Specific learning outcomes:

Students will be learn the meaning, significance, and history of key terms, including lesbian, gay, bisexual,

transgender, and queer.

Students will acquire a familiarity with the history of social movements involving sexuality and gender.

Students will learn to analyze and contextualize representations of LGBT people in the media, popular

culture, and politics.

Students will be able to define key analytic concepts in the study of sexuality, including heteronormativity

and homonormativity, and learn to make use of them in critically analyzing contemporary U.S. society,

including debates around same-sex marriage and transgender inclusion.

Students will develop their writing skills through two writing assignments.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Attendance and Punctuality. You are expected to attend every class, from start to finish. Attendance is

mandatory. Your overall course grade will be lowered by one half letter for each unexcused absence beginning

with the fourth one. Eight unexcused absences will result in a failing grade. Only documented emergencies and

medical occasions, or officially school-sanctioned activities, will qualify as excused absences.

Quizzes. There will be frequent short quizzes and in-class writing assignments on the readings assigned. Missed

quizzes cannot be made up.

Paper #1: Mini-Ethnography Paper. You are required to write a 3-page paper describing the place of lesbians,

gay men, bisexuals and/or transgender (LGBT) people in two social settings you know well. Examples of settings

you might write about include your high school, hometown, church, dorm, sports team, or workplace. If you grew

up outside the US, please devote at least half of your ethnography to your home culture. How are LGBT people

regarded and treated in these social worlds? How visible, accepted, and/or involved are they in these

communities? What are the terms that people use for them and/or that they use themselves—gay, lesbian, queer,

other, none? If you write about your high school or hometown, be sure to tell me where it is and briefly describe

its size and socio-economic, racial, and religious demographics. The paper is due in hard copy at the beginning of

class on September 13.

Paper #2: Queer Newark Conference Reaction Paper. You are required to attend the Queer Newark

conference on Saturday, November 12 from 9AM to 5PM in the Paul Robeson Campus Center, and write a 3-

page response paper about it, due in hard copy at the beginning of class on November 17. Detailed instructions for

the assignment will be given ahead of time. If you are unable to attend the conference, you are required to

complete an alternative assignment—also due at the beginning of class on November 17—in which you will read

Introduction to LGBT Studies syllabus – Page 2

a set of supplemental readings and write a 6-page response paper discussing them. No other alternative

assignment will be permitted.

Both papers must be typed, double-spaced in 12-point font (Times or Times New Roman), with 1-inch margins,

printed on standard white paper, and stapled. Handwritten submissions will not be accepted. Each paper must be

submitted in hard copy at the beginning of class on the due date. Late submissions will not be accepted, nor will

assignments not submitted on time due to a student’s unexcused absence.

Midterm and Final. We will have an in-class midterm on October 25 and a final exam on December 20 at 3PM.

Grading Breakdown. You must complete all assignments in order to pass this class. Grading will be as follows:

Quizzes – 25%; Paper #1 – 10%; Paper #2 – 15%; Midterm – 20%; Final – 30%.

REQUIRED TEXTS

There are two books you are required to purchase for this class. They should be available from the Rutgers-

Newark Bookstore on the first floor of Bradley Hall, or elsewhere online.

1) Deborah T. Meem, Michelle A. Gibson, and Jonathan F. Alexander, Finding Out: An Introduction to

LGBT Studies (Sage, 2010), ISBN 978-1412938655

2) George Chauncey, Why Marriage? The History Shaping Today’s Debate Over Gay Equality (Basic,

2004/2005), ISBN 978-0465009589

All other course readings will be posted on the course Blackboard site.

OTHER POLICIES

Policy on Academic Integrity (Cheating and Plagiarism). Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Any use of the ideas

or words of another person without proper acknowledgment of credit, or cheating on an exam, will result in

serious penalties up to and including a failing course grade. For more information, consult the university’s

Academic Integrity Policy (http://academicintegrity.rutgers.edu). Note that the uncited use of uncopyrighted

material such as Wikipedia entries constitutes plagiarism.

Policy on Disabilities. If you have a need for accommodation based on the impact of a documented disability,

please contact me privately as soon as possible.

Policy on Classroom Courtesy. Do not bring food, active cell phones, or other communications devices into the

classroom. If you mistakenly do bring an active phone and it rings, silence it immediately. Texting or answering

calls in class will result in significant penalties to your overall course grade. You are encouraged to engage with

contemporary controversies, and disagreements regarding our texts are welcome and productive. Please, however,

remain respectful at all times of one another and of the opinions of those with whom you may disagree. Failure to

abide by these rules may result in a lowered course grade, or removal from the classroom.

Policy on Office Hours. If you have questions about the syllabus or any aspect of this class, please feel free to

email me or come to my office hours. My office hours are for you; stop by with any questions you have about

assignments, readings, classroom discussions, other pertinent topics, or just to say hello. (If you need to cover

material from a missed class, however, please consult a classmate instead.) If your schedule conflicts with my

office hours, we can set up an appointment at a mutually agreeable time.

SCHEDULE OF READINGS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Thu, Sep 1: Introduction

“The Heterosexual Questionnaire” (1972)

Introduction to LGBT Studies syllabus – Page 3

Tue, Sep 6: Before Identity

Finding Out, pp. 1-25 (optional: pp. 26-41)

Chicago Gay Liberation Front, “Leaflet for the American Medical Association” (1970)

Anita Bryant and Bob Green, excerpt from Raising God’s Children (1977)

[Thu, Sep 8: No class – Monday schedule]

Tue, Sep 13: Sexology and the Construction of the Modern Homosexual

PAPER #1 DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS

Finding Out, pp. 43-64

Thu, Sep 15: Toward Liberation

Finding Out, pp. 65-90

Tue, Sep 20: Meanings of Stonewall

Dick Leitsch, “Police Raid on N.Y. Club Sets Off First Gay Riot” (1969)

Lige Clark and Jack Nichols, “N.Y. Gays: Will the Spark Die?” (1969)

Carl Wittman, “Refugees from Amerika: A Gay Manifesto” (1970)

“Three Taverns Challenge ABC Homosexual Rulings,” Asbury Park Press, Aug 27, 1967

Thu, Sep 22: Activist Lives: Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon

William Grimes, “Del Martin, Lesbian Activist, Dies at 87,” New York Times, Aug 28, 2008

IN-CLASS FILM SCREENING: No Secret Anymore: The Times of Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon (2003)

Tue, Sep 27: Beyond Stonewall

Finding Out, pp. 91-117

“Policy Concerning Homosexuality in the Armed Forces” (enacted by Congress, 1993)

“Military Readiness Enhancement Act of 2010” (introduced but not passed in 2009 and 2010

“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Act” (enacted by Congress, 2010)

Thu, Sep 29: Lawrence v. Texas and the Decriminalization of Sodomy

Carlos A. Ball, “Sex,” from From the Closet to the Courtroom

Tue, Oct 4: Nature, Nurture, and Identity

Finding Out, pp. 121-149

Thu, Oct 6: How Sex Changed

Joanne Meyerowitz, “Introduction,” from How Sex Changed

Karen McCarthy Brown, “Mimesis in the Face of Fear: Femme Queens, Butch Queens, and Gender Play

in the Houses of Greater Newark”

Tue, Oct 11: Inclusion and Equality

Finding Out, pp. 151-174

Thu, Oct 13: Queer Diversities

Finding Out, pp. 175-200

Tue, Oct 18: Intersectionalities I

Finding Out, pp. 201-227

Elly Fishman, “Grit & Glitter,” Chicago Reader, Aug 18, 2011

Thu, Oct 20: Review for midterm

Tue, Oct 25: IN-CLASS MIDTERM

Introduction to LGBT Studies syllabus – Page 4

Thu, Oct 27: Intersectionalities II

Allan Bérubé, “How Gay Stays White and What Kind of White It Stays”

Kelefa Sanneh, “Revelations: A Gospel Singer Comes Out,” New Yorker, Feb 8, 2010

Tue, Nov 1: Guest Lecture: Erin English

Thu, Nov 3: Queer Enclaves and the Politics of Location

Finding Out, pp. 399-429

Arlene Stein, “Right to Marry More Remote for Low-Income LGBT Couples,” Star-Ledger, Aug 26,

2011

Tue, Nov 8: Guest Lecture: Darnell Moore

Thu, Nov 10: Queer Newark

“A Movement Grows in Newark,” Advocate, Oct 14, 2003

Ronald Smothers, “Newark Preaches Tolerance of Gays Year After Killing,” New York Times, May 12,

2004

Manny Fernandez, “School Officials Black Out Photo of a Gay Student’s Kiss,” New York Times, Jun 24,

2007

IN-CLASS FILM SCREENING: Dreams Deferred: The Sakia Gunn Film Project (2008)

Sat, Nov 12: QUEER NEWARK CONFERENCE, PAUL ROBESON CAMPUS CENTER, 9AM-5PM

Tue, Nov 15: Guest Lecture: Stephen McNulty

Thu, Nov 17: AIDS and American Culture

PAPER #2 DUE AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS

Richard Meyer, “Rock Hudson’s Body”

Tue, Nov 22: Guest lecture: Julian Gill-Peterson

[Thanksgiving holiday]

Tue, Nov 29: Queer Families and Homonormativity

Michael Warner, “Beyond Gay Marriage”

Lisa Duggan, “Equality, Inc.”

Kath Weston, “Families We Choose”

Ann Pellegrini, “Consuming Lifestyle”

Thu, Dec 1: The Turn to Marriage in LGBT Politics

Why Marriage?, pp. 1-58

Tue, Dec 6: How Marriage Changed and Why It Became a Goal

Why Marriage?, pp. 59-136

Thu, Dec 8: The Present and Future

Why Marriage?, pp. 137-169

Megan Davidson, “Rethinking the Movement: Trans Youth Activism in New York City and Beyond”

Tue, Dec 13: Wrap-Up & Review for Exam

Margaret Talbot, “A Risky Proposal,” New Yorker, Jan 18, 2010

FINAL EXAM: Tuesday, December 20, 3-6PM, Hill 103

Introduction to LGBT Studies syllabus – Page 5

SOURCES FOR ARTICLES AND CHAPTERS

“The Heterosexual Questionnaire” (1972); attributed to Martin Rochlin, Ph.D.,

http://www.ala.org/ala/aboutala/offices/olos/olosprograms/preconferences/docs/Heterosexual_Questionnaire.pdf (and elsewhere on

the Internet in many versions)

Chicago Gay Liberation Front, “Leaflet for the American Medical Association (1970),” in Speaking Out: Activism and Protest in the 1960s

and 1970s (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 2010), 147-48

“The Pro-Family Movement: Anita Bryant and ‘Save Our Children,’ 1977,” in The United States Since 1945: A Documentary Reader, ed.

Robert P. Ingalls and David K. Johnson (Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), 162-66

Dick Leitsch, “Police Raid on N.Y. Club Sets Off First Gay Riot” (1969), and Lige Clark and Jack Nichols, “N.Y. Gays: Will the Spark

Die?” (1969), in Witness to Revolution: The Advocate Reports on Gay and Lesbian Politics, 1967-1999, ed. Chris Bull (Alyson,

1999), 11-17

“The Gay Liberation Movement: Carl Wittman, ‘Refugees from Amerika: A Gay Manifesto, 1969,” in The United States Since 1945: A

Documentary Reader, ed. Robert P. Ingalls and David K. Johnson (Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), 148-51

“Policy Concerning Homosexuality in the Armed Forces” (enacted by Congress, 1993), 10 U.S.C. § 654,

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/USCODE-2009-title10/pdf/USCODE-2009-title10-subtitleA-partII-chap37-sec654.pdf

“Military Readiness Enhancement Act of 2010” (introduced but not passed in 2009 and 2010),

http://lieberman.senate.gov/assets/pdf/DADT_Bill.pdf

“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Act” (enacted by Congress, 2010), http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-111hr2965enr/pdf/BILLS-

111hr2965enr.pdf

Carlos A. Ball, “Sex,” chapter 5 of From the Closet to the Courtroom: Five LGBT Rights Lawsuits That Have Changed Our Nation

(Boston: Beacon, 2010), 199-247

Joanne Meyerowitz, “Introduction,” from How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality in the United States (Cambridge: Harvard

University Press, 2006), 1-13

Karen McCarthy Brown, “Mimesis in the Face of Fear: Femme Queens, Butch Queens, and Gender Play in the Houses of Greater

Newark,” in Passing: Identity and Interpretation in Sexuality, Race, and Religion, ed. María Carla Sánchez and Linda Schlossberg

(New York: NYU Press, 2001), 208-227

Allan Bérubé, “How Gay Stays White and What Kind of White It Stays,” in Bérubé, My Desire for History: Essays in Gay, Community,

and Labor History, ed. John D’Emilio and Estelle B. Freedman (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2011), 202-230

Richard Meyer, “Rock Hudson’s Body,” from Inside/Out: Lesbian Theories, Gay Theories, ed. Diana Fuss (New York: Routledge, 1991),

259-288

Michael Warner, “Beyond Gay Marriage,” in Queer Cultures, ed. Deborah Carlin and Jennifer DeGrazia (Upper Saddle River, NJ:

Pearson/Prentice-Hall, 2004), 768-779

Lisa Duggan, “Equality, Inc.,” chapter 3 in The Twilight of Equality? Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy

(Boston: Beacon, 2003), 43-66

Kath Weston, “Families We Choose,” in Social Perspectives in Lesbian and Gay Studies, ed. Peter Nardi and Beth Schneider (New York:

Routledge, 1998), 390-411

Ann Pellegrini, “Consuming Lifestyle: Commodity Capitalism and Transformations in Gay Identity,” in Queer Globalizations: Citizenship

and the Afterlife of Colonialism, ed. Arnaldo Cruz-Malavé and Martin F. Manalansan IV (New York: NYU Press, 2002), 134-145

Megan Davidson, “Rethinking the Movement: Trans Youth Activism in New York City and Beyond,” in Queer Youth Cultures, ed. Susan

Driver (Albany: SUNY Press, 2008), 243-260