Lovin-Race,Gender and the Global City Syllabus Fall 2011

Instructor: C. Laura Lovin

Email: lovin@rci.rutgers.edu

Office Hours: MW 1:00-2:00 pm

 

Race, Gender and the Global City

21-988-390-01

MW 10:00-11:20

Smith Hall, Room 245

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

The course will enable students to understand the relations of power at work in shaping the contemporary cities and the everyday life experiences of their urban dwellers. The central question that will guide the inquiries of this course is: How does space impact on the construction of gender and race in both material and symbolic ways? We will explore the urban dimensions of the practices of work, transportation, housing, consumption, childcare, migration, entertainment, planning and politics in order to evaluate the opportunities and constraints that women, racialized groups, and other marginalized populations encounter while trying to access the resources of the city. Furthermore, the course will explore how the urban practices and institutions of the global city themselves construct new boundaries around the categories of gender, race, class and sexuality.

 

The course combines both classroom learning and experiential learning that enables students to experience the city and apply reading materials to their encounters with city.  A visit to the Newark Museum and the City Hall of Newark are included in the course schedule in order to enable students to interact with agents that participate in the structuring of the city’s physical environment and its social, economic and political interactions. Thus, Newark will become the context within which students could evaluate the concepts and theoretical frameworks presented in the course readings, materials and class discussions.

 

The LEARNING GOALS for THE GLOBAL CITY, RACE AND GENDER include:

 

To improve students’ understanding of the social and economic organization of the city through a consistent engagement with the analytical categories of gender, class, racialization and sexuality;

 

To provide students with theoretical and methodological tools to help them understand everyday urban realities, urban development and urban change in relation to the taken-for-granted assumptions about masculine, feminine, heterosexual, and racialized identities.

 

To provide students with the conceptual tools that will help them understand the value of systematic interdisciplinary interweaving of women’s and gender studies, sociology, geography, economics urban studies and anthropology.

 

To provide students with a range of case studies that reflect the persistent inequalities in the lived experiences of women and men in both the globalized north and the globalized south.

 

To introduce students to local community agents involved in Newark’s urban development as well as in the preservation of Newark’s history.

 

To develop students’ sense of agency through mobilizing conceptual tools and research methods towards a research project whose findings aims to contribute to social change.

 

CLASS REQUIREMENTS

 

*Class participation  – 20 %

**Homework assignments – 25 %

***1 Class presentation (group assignment) – 15 %

****1 Final research paper:

 Research proposal (2 pages, see guidelines)

 Research presentation at THE END OF SEMESTER MINI CONFERENCE 10%

 Final Research Paper(10 pages) 20 %

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS. EVALUATION CRITIRIA

* Class Participation:

Since the format of the class is discussion based, regular class attendance and reading that is complete, careful and on schedule is essential! Readings must be completed before class because class discussion, activities and POP-UP quizzes will be closely aligned with the content of readings for each week. Students who are more than five minutes late will be marked absent. Bring the print-outs of the reading materials and your textbook to class. Failing to do so will affect your participation grade (0.5 point will be deducted per class if you show up without hard copies of your reading material). If you are physically absent from class, it is your responsibility to get notes and information about assignments you missed from your classmates or myself.

 

I will determine your participation grade by how your contribution demonstrates that you have read the articles and carefully thought about the topics discussed that day. Each week, students will be assigned a participation grade in the range of 0 to 2 points based on their involvement in class discussion and small group activities.

 

More than two absences will lower your final grade with a letter grade. Four absences result in an F.

 

0     -- absent;

0.5  -- present and attentive; not disruptive and involved in side talking; tries to respond when called but does not offer informed answers; demonstrates very infrequent involvement in discussion;

1     -- present, does not offer to contribute to discussion, but contributes to a moderate degree when called on; demonstrates adequate preparation; knows basic facts and straightforward information from the reading, but does not show evidence of trying to interpret or analyze them; demonstrates sporadic involvement, perhaps once a class.

1.5    -- present, demonstrates ongoing involvement; demonstrates good preparation, knows the reading facts and the implications of the arguments well; contributes well to discussion: thinks through own points, questions others in a constructive way; responds to other student's points; offers and supports ideas that might be counter to the common-sense or to the majority opinion; is focused and does not dominate class discussion or small group interactions.

2       -- present, demonstrates excellent preparation and ongoing involvement, is able to relate class materials to readings from previous weeks, course materials, current events and debates, experiences, etc. while keeping the analysis focused; offers analysis and evaluation of the reading materials; responds thoughtfully to other students' questions and develops new approaches to take the discussion further; contributes to cooperative argument-building.

 

Homework assignments

 

Each class requires a homework assignment. The homework assignments vary in form from multiple-choice to open ended questions and from textual analysis to reports on experiential learning activities. Each homework assignment will be deposited in on Blackboard by 9:30 am before class. Late homework assignments will not be considered. Each assignment will be letter graded and the semester average letter grade will constitute 25% of your final grade for this course.

 

Class presentation. Group Project

On Wednesdays, a group of approx. 3 students will be responsible for leading that day’s class discussion by closely engaging with the assigned reading materials. This assignment gives you the opportunity to share ideas, read closely, act creatively and coordinate with your colleagues.

Each student should present for no longer than 15 minutes on the assigned reading material and the further research that s/he conducted. This should be followed by class discussion on the questions that the presenters proposed. In your presentation, you will do the following:

  • Outline the structure of the argument.
  • Briefly define/discuss one or two of the most relevant concepts developed by the author.
  • Review two main points that the author makes in relation to previous reading materials or outside of the reading list sources.
  • Conduct further research on two of the arguments and concepts presented in the article.
  • Research further and explain the terms that were insufficiently developed by the author/s.
  • Facilitate class discussion on two questions that you formulate in relation to the article. The questions should be formulated in close relation to the content of the reading materials. (Avoid impressionistic questions that solicit opinion instead of engagement with the article’s arguments)
  • Presentations should not exceed 15 minutes.
  • Presentations will be delivered in power point format.
  • The power-point file with your presentation will be deposited in the “Drop Box” of the course on Blackboard

 

Research Paper

Research proposals will be presented during the 10/24 and 10/26 classes.

This proposal will not be graded. However, if you do not present and hand one in, I will deduct five points from the final grade of the paper.

  1. Main research question or hypothesis
  2. Literature informing your analysis:
    1. From the reading list (3 references)
    2. Outside sources (3 articles published in academic journals)
  3. Methods of data collection
  4. Ideas you want to discuss with or get feedback on from your colleagues.

 

Research Presentation for the End of Semester Mini-Conference

(Guidelines on how to proceed with preparing your power-point and the presentation will be provided. Students are responsible for setting one or two appointments to discuss their initial ideas and the progress of their research.)

 

 

Final Research Paper:

(Guidelines on how to proceed with thinking, researching and writing this paper will be provided. Students are responsible for setting one or two appointments to discuss their initial ideas and the progress of their research.)

 

How to revise and improve your research paper:

 

  • After you have finished the paper, read it through and:
    1. Underline the main argument of the paper
    2. Put a check mark in the left column next to statements that support and explain the argument
    3. Circle the conclusion
  • Read the paper again, and consider rigorously the following questions:
    1. Does the first paragraph present my argument and the approach I am taking in presenting that argument. If not, what is missing, unclear, understated, and insufficiently developed?
    2. Does the argument progress clearly from one paragraph to the next? Is the organization of the paper logical? Does each paragraph add to the argument by adding layers, evidence and analytical details to the main purpose of the paper? If not, where does the structure break down, and/or which paragraph/s is/are problematic and why?
    3. Does the writer support the argument with credible and clear textual evidence and empirical evidence? Please indicate where there is a paragraph weak on evidence or featuring evidence not supporting the argument.
    4. Does the conclusion draw together the strands of the argument? If not, what is missing?
    5. What is the best part of the paper?
    6. Which sections of the paper need most improvement?
    7. Proceed with the papers’ improvements.

GRADING SCALE

A: 93-100, B+; 87-92, B: 81-86, C+: 76-80, C: 70-75, D: 65-69; F: 64 and under

 

POLICY ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

http://academicintegrity.rutgers.edu/integrity.shtml

 

GROUND RULES

In order to create a safe environment for sharing personal information, to ensure that discussions are passionate without descending into argumentations, that everyone is heard, and that participants work together toward greater understanding rather than contribute disjointed pieces, everyone should follow these ground rules:

Listen actively and attentively.

Ask for clarification if confused.

Do not interrupt one another.

Challenge one another, but do so respectfully.

Critique ideas, not people.

Do not offer opinions without supporting textual evidence.

Avoid put downs.

Take responsibility for the quality of the discussion.

Build on one another’s comments, work towards shared understanding.

Always have your book or reading in front of you.

Do not monopolize the discussion.

If you speak from your own experience, make sure you don’t generalize.

If you are offended by anything said during the discussion, acknowledge it immediately.

 

REQUIRED TEXTBOOK FROM THE BOOKSTORE

 

Cities and Gender by Helen Jarvis, Jonathan Cloke and Paula Kantor, Published 2009 by Routledge (Available at the Bookstore at 167 University Avenue.)

 

The reading materials marked (BB) should be downloaded and printed out from the Blackboard site of the class. The first chapter of the textbook is also made available in pdf. format on Blackboard.

 

 

 

 

COURSE SCHEDULE

SETTING THE TERMS: CITY, GENDER, RACE

WEEK 1  Wednesday, 09/08

Introductions, Logistics, and Course Overview

Thursday, 09/09

Jan Lopez: “The Social Construction of Race,” from An Introduction to Women’s Studies. Gender in a Transnational World, edited by Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan, 2006 (BB)

Judith Lorber: “The Social Construction of Gender,” from The Feminist Philosophy Reader, edited by Alison Bailey and Chris Cuomo, 2007  (BB)

WEEK 2 Monday, 09/12

Chapter 1 “From Binaries to Intersections,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009 (BB)

Wednesday, 09/14

Ash Amin: The Economic Base of Contemporary Cities, from The Blackwell City Reader, edited by Gary Bridge and Sophie Watson, 2010 (BB)

THINKING ABOUT THE CITY. HISTORICAL  AND METHODOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

WEEK 3  Monday, 09/19

Chapter 2 “Historical Trends in Cities and Urban Studies,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Clarke, 2009.

Wednesday, 09/21

E. Barbara Philips: “Posing the Question,” from City Lights. Urban-Suburban Life in the Global Society, 1996 (BB)

MUSEUM TRIP: Visit to the Ballantine House Wing of the Newark Museum

FEMINIST PERSPECTIVES ON URBAN TRANSFORMATION

WEEK 4 Monday, 09/26

Chapter 3 “Trends in urban restructuring, gender and feminist theory,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009

Wednesday, 09/28

Doreen Massey: “Space, Place and Gender,” from Gender, Space, Architecture, 2000 (BB)

Pierrette Hondagneu Sotelo: “Maid in L.A.,” from Feminist Frontiers edited by Verta Taylor et al, 2007 (BB)

Sylvia Chant: “Female Employment in Puerto Vallarta. A Case Study,” from An Introduction to Women’s Studies. Gender in a Transnational World, edited by Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan, 2006 (BB)

THE CITY AND ITS POWER RELATIONS

WEEK 5  Monday, 10/03

Chapter 4 “Scale, power and interdependence,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009

Wednesday, 10/05

Melissa Ditmore: “In Calcutta, Sex Workers Organize,” from The Affective Turn: Theorizing the Social, edited by Patricia Clough, 2007 (BB)

 

Harmony Goldberg: “Building Power in the City: Reflections on the Emergence of the Right to the City Alliance and the National Domestic Worker’s Alliance” 2009 (BB)

GENDER, RACE AND THE BUILT ENVORONMENT OF THE CITY

WEEK 6 Monday, 10/10

Chapter 5 “Infrastructure of Daily Life,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Clarke, 2009

Wednesday, 10/12

Dolores Hayden: “What would a Non-sexist City Be Like? Speculations on Housing, Urban Design, and Human Work,” from Women and the American City edited by Catharine R. Stimpson et al., 1981 (BB)

Loenie Sandercock and Ann Forsyths, “A Gender Agenda: New Directions for Planning Theory,” from Journal of American Planning Association, 1992 (BB)

WEEK 7 Monday 10/17

Susan S. Fainstein: “New Directions in Planning Theory,” from The Blackwell City Reader, edited by Gary Bridge and Sophie Watson, 2010 (BB)

Wednesday 10/19

Michael E. Porter: “The Competitive Advantage of the Inner City,” from The City Reader, edited by Richard T. LeGates and Frederic Stout 2003 (BB)

William Julius Wilson: “The Black Underclass,” from The City Reader, edited by Richard T. LeGates and Frederic Stout, 1996 (BB)

WEEK 8 Monday 10/24

CITY HALL Visit: Meeting with the specialists to talk about the gender dimension of Newark’s urban development plan

or

Visit to the CITY WITHOUT WALLS Art Gallery

Wednesday 10/26

Students’ Presentations of Final Research Proposals:

(Line-up of presentations: alphabetical order by the presenters’ last name)

  • Research question/s,
  • Theoretical framework
  •  Research method

WEEK 9 Monday 10/31

Students’ Presentations of Final Research Proposals Continued

THE GLOBAL CITY. ECONOMIES, MIGRATIONS, NETWORKS and COMMUNITIES

Wednesday 11/2

Neil Brenner and Nik Theodore: “Cities and the Geographies of “Actually Existing Neoliberalism,” from The Blackwell City Reader, edited by Gary Bridge and Sophie Watson, 2010

WEEK 10  Monday 11/7

Chapter 6 “Migration, movement and mobility,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009

Wednesday 11/9

Lydia Potts: “Excerpt from the World Labor Market,” from An Introduction to Women’s Studies. Gender in a Transnational World, edited by Inderpal Grewal and Caren Kaplan, 2006

Linda Briskin: “Unions: Resistance and Mobilization,” from A Companion to Gender Studies, 2009

Agneta H. Fisher and Annelis E. M. van Vianen: “Corporate Masculinity,” from A Companion to Gender Studies, edited by Philomena Essed et al 2009

WEEK 11 Monday 11/14

Chapter 7 “Homes, Jobs, Communities and Networks,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009

Wednesday 11/16

Michael Sibalis: “Urban Space and Homosexuality: The Example of the Marais, Paris’ ‘Gay Ghetto’,” from Finding out. An Introduction to LGBT Studies, edited by Deborah T. Meen et al 2010

George Chauncey: “Building Gay Neighborhood Enclaves: The Village and Harlem,”  from The Blackwell City Reader, edited by Gary Bridge and Sophie Watson, 2010

WEEK 12 Monday 11/21

Chapter 8 “Planning and Social Welfare,” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009

Wednesday 11/23: THANKS GIVING

WEEK 13 Monday 11/28

Chapter 9 “Urban Poverty, Livelihood and Vulnerability” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009

Wednesday 11/30

Chapter 10 “Cities and Gender—Politics in Practice” from Cities and Gender, edited by Helen Jarvis with Paula Kantor and Jonathan Cloke, 2009

Harmony Goldberg: “Building Power in the City: Reflections on the Emergence of the Right to the City Alliance and the National Domestic Worker’s Aliance,” from In the Middle of a Whirlwind, 2007

WEEK 14 Gender, Race and the Global City – END OF SEMESTER MINI CONFERENCE

Monday, 12/5

Students’ Research Presentations

(Line-up of presentations: alphabetical order by the presenters’ last name)

Wednesday, 12/7

Students’ Research Presentations

WEEK 16 Monday, 12/12

Student’s Research Presentations

Final Paper Due: Wednesday 12/14 in my mailbox at the Women’s and Gender Studies, Cocklin Hall.

 

ADDENDUM -- To be printed and submitted as cover page to your final research paper

 

Before submitting your research paper make sure that you have reviewed the following checklist. Please complete this checklist (make changes to your work if necessary) and staple it to each paper you submit for this course.

I have addressed all parts of the assignment____

My argument would be clear and unambiguous to any reader____

My paragraphs are organized logically and help advance my argument____

I use a variety of evidence (e.g. quotes, examples, statistics, interviews, fieldnotes, previously published data and analyses) to reinforce my argument(s)___

My conclusion summarizes my argument and explores its implications; it does not simply restate the topic paragraph____

I have revised my paper____times to improve its organization, argument, sentence structure, and style.

I have proofread my paper carefully, not relying on my computer to do it for me____

My name is at the top of the paper___

The paper is stapled___

The margins are 1inch___

The paper is double-spaced___

I have not used anyone else’s work, ideas, or language without citing them appropriately___

All my sources are in my bibliography, which is properly formatted ___

I have read the plagiarism policy ___

 

 

Name________________