Annual Donor Recognition Dinner

Thu, 04/12/2012 - 6:00pm - 8:30pm
Aidekman Neuroscience Center
Alumni Event

A reception will take place from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. followed by Dinner and a Recognition Ceremony from 7:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Vanessa McDonald-Hobbs
9733535641

IECME Pledge Form

Date added: 
08/16/2011

Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience

Our website is now at http://www.cmbn.rutgers.edu.

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Spring - 2011

Date added: 
08/08/2011

Program Details

Areas of Study:
  • a
Associated Degree:
  • BA

Locations:
  • On Campus
Program Duration:
  • 4yr
Program Level:
  • Bachelors
Program Type:
  • Traditional Degree

Description

Courses

Core Courses (Undergraduate)

21:988:201  Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3)

21:988:205 Introduction to LGBTQ Studies (3)

21:988:325  Politics of Sexuality (3)

21:988:389, 390 Topics in Women's and Gender Studies

21:988:532 Feminist History and Theory

21:988: ? Internship

21:988:? Independent Study

 

RELATED COURSES (Undergraduate)

21:014:305 BLACK WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES (3) See African-American and African Studies 014.

21:070:340 COMPARATIVE ROLES OF WOMEN (3)See Anthropology 070. 21:082:207

ART AND WOMEN (3) See Art History 082.

21:220:312 WOMEN IN THE AMERICAN ECONOMY (3)See Economics 220.

21:350:360 TOPICS IN WOMEN AND LITERATURE (3) See English 350.

21:350:361,362 WOMEN IN LITERATURE (3,3) See English 350.

21:300: MASCULINITIES IN EDUCATION (3) See Urban Education 300

21:512:337 HISTORY OF THE FAMILY IN THE UNITED STATES (3) See American History 512.

21:512:373,374 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN THE UNITED STATES (3,3) See American History 512.

21:730:327 PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES OF FEMINISM (3)See Philosophy 730. 21:790:356 SEX, LAW, AND PUBLIC POLICY (3) See Political Science 790.

21:830:373 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN (3) See Psychology 830. 21:920:306 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY (3) See Sociology 920.

21:920:337 SOCIOLOGY OF SEX AND GENDER (3) See Sociology 920.

21:014:370 WOMEN'S LITERATURE OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA(3) See African-American & African Studies 014.

21:014:255 RACE, GENDER AND AMERICAN FILM(3) See African-American & African Studies 014 21:120:208 HUMAN SEXUALITY(3) See Biology 120.

21:830:469 PSYCHOLOGY OF SEXUAL ORIENTATION(3) See Psychology 830.

21:830:373 PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN(3) See Psychology 830.

21:512:337 HISTORY OF THE FAMILY IN THE U.S.(3) See History 512.

21:512:373,374 HISTORY OF WOMEN IN U.S.(3) See History 512

21:512:? HISTORY OF PORNOGRAPHY(3) See History 512

Program Details

Areas of Study:
  • a
Associated Degree:
  • PhD

Locations:
  • On Campus
Program Level:
  • Doctoral
Program Type:
  • Traditional Degree

Description

Admissions

Our Ph.D. program solicits applications from qualified students from the U.S. and abroad for our Ph.D. program. Students are normally considered only for admission in the fall semester and only for full-time study.

The formal process for applying to the Ph.D. program is handled centrally by the Rutgers Office of Graduate Admissions –  http://gradstudy.rutgers.edu. Please do not send your application materials directly to the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science or to the Graduate Director.  The telephone number for the Graduate Admissions Newark Office is (973) 353-5205.

Admission Deadlines:
Deadline for Financial Aid  -  March 1
Deadline for International Students  -  March 1
Deadline for U.S. Students  -  June 30

Applications to the program must include various supporting materials including transcripts of previous collegiate study, 3 letters of recommendation, and scores from the General Graduate Record Examination. Scores from Mathematics Subject GRE are highly recommended.  Applicants who are not native speakers of English are required to submit a TOEFL score. 

Students who have been accepted will be notified by the Graduate Director and the Office of Admission about the type and amount of funding he/she will receive.

Degree Requirements

Students are required to complete the following core courses:

Real Analysis I, Real Analysis II, Complex Variables I, Algebra I, Algebra II, Topology I, Topology II, and Differentiable Manifolds.  Students who have a Master’s Degree and have completed equivalent course work, may have the above mentioned courses waived.

Additionally, all students are required to complete at least 24 credits of advanced elective courses.  These electives are chosen in consultation with the student`s Advisor, the Advisory Committee, and with the permission of the Graduate Program Director.

Written Qualifying Examination: The Ph.D. Qualifying Examination consists of three parts with each part covering the basic topics in a particular discipline: 

Part 1  -  Real and Complex Analysis
Part 2  -  Algebra
Part 3  -  Topology and Geometry

The exams are usually given right after the student finishes the course covering the particular topic.  Students are expected to pass all Qualifying Exams no later than January of their third year.

Foreign Language Requirement:  None

Dissertation:  After successful completion of the Qualifying Exam, students begin their doctoral research under the direction of a faculty member.  All students are required to take at least 24 credits of doctoral dissertation research.  Upon completion, the dissertation is presented to the Thesis Committee which conducts a final oral examination. 

The dissertation itself must be a single entity and a clearly written account of the student's original research.  In addition to a description of the details and results of the research, it should contain an appropriate general and contextual introduction, written at a level accessible to others working in the wider field.  If the thesis consists of more than one piece of research, the elements of the dissertation must be related parts of a common research program and should be tied together in the introduction and the conclusion.

The student and his advisor should propose an outside committee member to the Graduate Program Director at least one month before the defense date. The formal doctoral defense should normally be scheduled at least one month in advance of the defense date.  The committee members should all be present at the defense.  Sometimes it is infeasible for the outside committee member to attend the defense.  In this case, the outside committee member should write a letter to the graduate program director indicating that he or she approves of the thesis.

Reappointment:  Teaching Assistants and Graduate Students are reappointed each year. Candidates for reappointment are judged on a combination of Instructional Competence and Scholarly Progress.  Reappointments are always subject to availability of funds. 

Instructional Competence: Each semester, Teaching Assistants and Graduate Students must show good performance in their teaching assignments to be considered for reappointment. Students may be put on probation, subject to future assessment, and possibly denied further support, if their performance is not deemed adequate.

Scholarly Progress – Year 1:  Satisfactory progress for first year Teaching Assistants or Graduate Students should include good performance in all coursework (grades less than B are poor, while grades of B+ and A are considered satisfactory.)   If most of a student's work is in advanced courses which offer only Pro-Forma grades (“Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory” grades), additional criteria may be used such as certification by faculty members of active and satisfactory participation in these courses.  Students may be put on probation, subject to future assessment, and possibly denied further support, if their performance is not deemed adequate.

Scholarly Progress – Year 2:  Satisfactory progress for second year Teaching Assistants and Graduate Students should include good performance in all course work (grades less than B are poor, while grades of B+ and A are considered satisfactory.)   If most of a student's work is in advanced courses which offer only Pro-Forma grades (“Satisfactory” or “Unsatisfactory” grades), additional criteria may be used such as certification by faculty members of active and satisfactory participation in these courses.  Students who have not already taken and passed their Qualifying Exam should show signs that they are preparing to take this exam sometime during the third year of study.  Students may be put on probation, subject to future assessment, and possibly denied further support, if their performance is not deemed adequate.

Scholarly Progress - Year 3 and Beyond:  Satisfactory progress for students in their third year or beyond should certainly include passing the Qualifying Exam by January of the third year.  Students may be denied of support, if the exam has not been done.  Students who have taken and passed their Qualifying Exam should be making progress towards completion of their Ph.D. Such progress should include a choice of a thesis area and an advisor.  Departmental evaluation of further progress will depend primarily on the assessment of the student's thesis advisor. Ordinarily, the Mathematics Department hopes to extend support to its students making satisfactory progress at least through the end of five years of study.  Beyond that, the Department will consider each student individually and may need to put some students on the waiting list for support.  The eventual support decision will be based on the resources available.

380:609 Syllabus

Date added: 
07/27/2011

Faculty of Arts & Sciences Newark Honors College

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The Writing Program

The Writing Program at Rutgers-Newark

Writing Program courses focus on reading and writing as interconnected processes that are central to academic inquiry. All courses in the unified writing curriculum are insistently text-based courses, where the readings provide the occasions for the writing experiences. Students receive instruction and experience in analyzing concepts in individual works, exploring connections between works, and developing independent ideas while synthesizing multiple sources in analytical, argumentative writing assignments.

Writing Program courses are process-oriented, skills-based courses that encourage students to engage ideas, language, and texts with intellectual curiosity. Through class discussions, low-stakes exercises, and high-stakes writing assignments, students broaden their understanding of what constitutes text and develop their ability to read academic texts critically and analytically, to discuss them knowledgeably and articulately, and to write about them thoughtfully, analytically, and coherently. Students also develop independent voices while they learn to connect their ideas to those of others through effective research.

Writing Program instructors work closely with their students, and the Writing Program provides additional instruction and support to our diverse student body through tutoring, workshops, and intensive courses.

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Welcome to the Rutgers-Newark 
 
Writing Program
 

 
The Writing Program offers a unified writing
 
curriculum designed to develop students’
 
critical thinking, reading, and writing skills,
 
core skills that provide the foundation for
 
students’ academic careers.

 

Mission | Pedagogy | Courses | Requirements | Writing Support | MLL | Writing Across the Currriculum