Spring 2018


Spring 2018

 

Children Literature
Instructor: Patel
21:350:211:01      T/TH 4:00-5:20 pm

This course is intended to present some of the high points of children’s literature in the west over the past two centuries in an attempt to identify nuances in the relationship between children’s literature and the society from which it originates. Students will evaluate how children’s literature reinforces, challenges, and changes society’s construction of childhood—at large. It will become evident that over time, children’s literature has come to serves as more than a mere means of entertaining the young. Course readings are introduced chronologically from Perrault’s and Grimms’ fairy tales, through the Golden Age of Children’s Literature, to contemporary Young Adult (YA) fiction. Students will explore a multitude of literary (and non-literary) genres, in addition to children’s fairy [and folk] tales, novels, poems, and a graphic novel.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Children Literature
Dr. Kahn
21:350:211:61      Tuesday, 6:00-9:00 pm

Not a survey, this course attempts to cover some of the high points of literature for children in the West over the past two centuries, moving from the Grimms’s fairy tales to the present, and generically from folk and fairy tales through more literary fairy tales (Andersen) to the golden age of Victorian and Edwardian children’s literature and finally to 20th-century fables, poetry, and fantasy. This interdisciplinary course draws upon the fields of education, psychology, anthropology, social work, and others. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Mythology in Literature
Professor Hadas
21:350:212:Q1      T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Concentrating on but not limiting itself to Greek mythology, this course considers some salient literary works which both draw from mythology and simultaneously contribute to the dynamic ongoing mythological tradition that began with the Homeric epics and continues to flourish in the 21st century in books, movies, TV, theater, graphic novels, and video games.  Readings range chronologically from Homer (ca 700 BCE) to two 21st c. works (a novel and a graphic novel), Greek and other plays, lyric poems culled from a tradition over two thousand years old, and a long modernist poem from the 20th century. (Readings will vary somewhat from one semester to the next.) We will consider myth as both shaped by and contributing to an ongoing tradition; we'll also look at various theoretical analyses of mythology.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Mythology in Literature
Professor Hadas
21:350:211:Q2      T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

Concentrating on but not limiting itself to Greek mythology, this course considers some salient literary works which both draw from mythology and simultaneously contribute to the dynamic ongoing mythological tradition that began with the Homeric epics and continues to flourish in the 21st century in books, movies, TV, theater, graphic novels, and video games.  Readings range chronologically from Homer (ca 700 BCE) to two 21st c. works (a novel and a graphic novel), Greek and other plays, lyric poems culled from a tradition over two thousand years old, and a long modernist poem from the 20th century. (Readings will vary somewhat from one semester to the next.) We will consider myth as both shaped by and contributing to an ongoing tradition; we'll also look at various theoretical analyses of mythology. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Literary Masterpieces
Instructor: Elias
21:350:215:63       Thursday, 6:00-9:00 pm
Introduction to great works of world literature; develops the ability to read with understanding and to enjoy literature that appeals to educated and mature readers. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Introduction to Global Literature
Professor Chander
21:350:223:01       M/W 10:00-11:20 am
This course introduces students to literatures from different regions of the globe at different historical moments while examining the challenges and possibilities of such terms as “world literature,” “global literature,” and “comparative literature.” How do diverse texts speak to common issues and to one another? How do issues of translation and accessibility shape our understanding of literary texts? And, how do we as scholars organize and categorize texts that represent very different historical contexts? This course satisfies the core requirement.

Love Stories: Medieval to Modern
Professor Heffernan
21:350:225:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am
A consideration of love in literature from the fourteenth-century courtly romance to the twentieth-century American best-selling novel.  Readings will include a memoir by a fourteenth-century mystic, plays by Shakespeare, novels by Jane Austen and D. H. Lawrence as well as short stories by James Joyce.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Love Stories: Medieval to Modern
Dr. Fitzpatrick
21:350:225:63       Thursday, 6:00-9:00 pm
This course will upend standard narratives of the “love story”, from the medieval period to the 21st Century, by focusing on its shadow: “the love that dare not speak its name” As a literature course, it will focus on the ways in which authors have repeatedly been able (and compelled) to use or abuse recognized formal ‘rules’ to say things about this love that had previously been unsayable. It will also provide insight into the historical experiences of those people in the English-speaking world who have find themselves unwilling or able to love others (or imagine themselves) in the ways accepted notions of sex and gender provided.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Comics & Graphic Novels Lab
Instructor: White
21:350:229:01       M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

Comics & Graphic Novels
Professor Akhimie
21:350:230:01       M/W 10:00-11:20 am

In Comics and Graphic Novels we will read and discuss recent contributions to the genre, developing a critical framework and vocabulary for defining, describing and discussing this popular but amorphous medium. This course satisfies the core requirement.

The Art of Satire
Professor Lynch
21:350:231:01       M/W 4:00-5:20 pm
A study of the theory and practice of satire from Horace and Juvenal through Doonesbury and The Colbert Report, with stops along the way at Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, and Lord Byron. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Forces in Modern Literature
Dr.  Kahn
21:350:248:01       Wednesday, 6:00-9:00 pm

In this course, we will look at controversial works of literature, film, and visual art, considering the relationship between art and society as well as art as a critique of culture. We will ask many questions in this course, including: How have race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality historically factored in critical reception? Why is art a continual site of cultural contestation? How do aesthetic controversies reflect fundamental beliefs that structure society?   This course satisfies the core requirement.

Forces in Modern Literature
Professor Chander
21:350:248:90       ON-LINE
Examines on a number of literary controversies from the early nineteenth century to the present day in order to discuss the function of art in society.  Why is literature such a charged category? How does it become a site of contention in ideological struggles? This course satisfies the core requirement.

Foundation of Literary Study * Writing Intensive *
Professor Sohrawardy
21:350:308:Q1      ON-LINE

This course provides English majors with a firm foundation in the terms, concepts, and issues of literary analysis. Readings include selections from the major genres (poetry, fiction, drama, and nonfiction prose) together with a variety of critical and historical approaches. Assignments introduce students to the goals and methods of literary research, and provide practice in reading critically, constructing arguments and writing persuasively about literature. In this writing intensive course, students will submit written work throughout the semester as well as read and discuss each other's writing in guided, in-class workshops.

Shakespeare
Professor Sohrawardy
21:350:319:90      ON-LINE

A sampling of history, tragedy, comedy, and romance in plays representing the span of Shakespeare`s creative life.

Shakespeare
Professor Akhimie
21:350:320:01      ON-LINE

This course will offer a critical and historical introduction to Shakespeare's comedies, histories, tragedies and romances, situating the Shakespeare’s works historically and placing an emphasis on questions of gender, race, class and cultural difference in the plays and in the period. Course assignments will focus on reading, understanding and writing about Shakespeare's dramatic language.

Survey of English Literature
Professor Heffernan
21:350:321:01       T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Major works of English Literature through Paradise Lost.

Modern British Poetry
Professor Hirschberg
21:350:342:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

Poetry from the 1920s to the present: Eliot, Auden, Spenser, Thomas, Hughes, Larkin, and others.

Topics in Literature: Representing Refugees
Professor Abbas         
21:350:381:01       T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

This course seeks to introduce students to important questions regarding citizenship, identity, statelessness, displacement, and exile while providing a historical and broader geographical dimension to our understanding of the current so called refugee "crisis" in the West.   At the same time it seeks to introduce students to questions of representation and form.  How do different visual and written forms--documentary, drama, short stories, poetry--represent refugees?  What is at stake in each representation?  How do we as readers and viewers get implicated in the politics of representation that are informed by present attitudes towards refugees?

Seminar in Med Lit * Writing Intensive *
Professor Heffernan
21:350:440:Q1      T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

The course will focus on Chaucer's CANTERBURY TALES. Some attention will be given to the poet's work outside of the tale collection. Major Chaucer scholarship as well as the current scene in Chaucer studies will be integrated into the term's work.

Seminar in British Authors * Writing Intensive *
Professor Baker
21:350:440:Q1      M/TH 1:00-2:20 pm

The focus of the course will be Shakespeare and Milton, in particular works that highlight the impact of theater and theatricality on Milton’s development as a poet. We will be reading across different early modern genres, for instance, masque, closet drama, and epic, while at the same time considering non-literary forces that affected both writers.


American Literature 352

Writers at Newark II * Writing Intensive *
Instructor Lima
21:352:208:Q1      T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

The objectives of this course, based each semester on the books of the writers featured in the Writers At Newark Reading Series, are to diversify our understanding of contemporary American writing in fiction and poetry, and to explore the development of personal identity in the books of prominent writers who work to sculpt individualized voices within a framework of multiplicitous American identities. Students have the unique opportunity to attend readings by the visiting writers at monthly readings and Q&As. Completion of this course requires attendance at all 4 (Tuesday, 5 p.m.) readings. See www.ncas.rutgers.edu/mfa for Writers At Newark schedule and writer bios.

Literature of New Jersey
Professor Kiniry
21:352:209:01       M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

The course samples New Jersey literature from the 18th century to modern times and includes fiction, poetry, memoirs, folklore, and non-fiction.  Its central themes are Jersey narratives and Jersey myths.  Writers include Mark Mappen’s Jerseyan, the poetry of Walt Whitman, William Carlos Williams and Allen Ginsberg, and fiction by Philip Roth and Junot Diaz. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Hirschberg
21:352:211:01            T/F 8:30-9:50 am

Enduring favorites in American literatures since World War II in different genres, including works by Anne Tyler, Jerzy Kosinski, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Raymond Carver, Christopher Durgang, Amy Tan, Sam Shepard, Paul Auster, Toni Morrison, Jessica Hagedorn, Frank McCourt, Joyce Carol Oates, James Baldwin, and Flannery O’Connor. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Professor Hirschberg
21:352:212:01            T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Enduring favorites in American literatures since World War II in different genres, including works by Anne Tyler, Jerzy Kosinski, Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Raymond Carver, Christopher Durgang, Amy Tan, Sam Shepard, Paul Auster, Toni Morrison, Jessica Hagedorn, Frank McCourt, Joyce Carol Oates, James Baldwin, and Flannery O’Connor.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Instructor: Reyes
21:352:212:02            M 2:30-3:50/ W 1:00-2:20 pm

This course will expose students to recent trends in contemporary American literature from approximately 1940 to the present. While this course spans across 60 years of literature and may appear different from one another in style— novels, short stories, novellas, memoirs, and plays— they all meet on similar themes of gender, race, violence, war, sexuality, alienation, and trauma; therefore uniting worlds that would seem disjointed at first glance and uniting the interpretations of individual American experience. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Contemporary American Literature
Dr. Fitzpatrick
21:352:212:61            Tuesday, 6:00-9:00 pm

This course provides one account of recent American poetry, beginning in about 1980. Whilst it is necessarily a partial account, it aims to follow key arguments both about what a poem should be (form, and the politics of language) and what a poet should be (authorship, and the politics of identity) over this period, giving particular attention to the ways they overlap. It also aims to please, and to introduce you to a wide range of contemporary poetry that is useful, beautiful, and often even joyful.   This course satisfies the core requirement.

American Literature of the 19th Century
Professor Bland
21:352:213:01       W/F 8:30-9:50 am

Nineteenth century American literature in the decades before the Civil War emerged from a broad variety of literary voices, each of which was seeking to address the qualities and characteristics particular to the experiences of being American.  This course will particularly concentrate on the historical contexts of American literature, its origins, the development of its canon, and the diversity of its writers and readers.  By examining topics including nature, race and slavery, the roles of women, and other broad, national ideas during this period, the course will focus on one major issue:  How did the United States establish its own voice and literary culture? The readings in this course are drawn from the early decades of the nineteenth century through the Civil War This course satisfies the core requirement.

American Literature of the 19th Century
Professor Bland
21:352:214:01       W/F 11:30-12:50 pm

This course examines some of the major developments in American literature of the nineteenth century in the decades following the Civil War—an era of rapid and sweeping social, economic, political, technological, and cultural changes, and an era during which the definitions of both “American” and “literature” have been hotly contested.  Our study of the major literary movements of this period—Romanticism, Realism, and Naturalism, plus selected subgenres within these—will focus on two major issues: Why particular movements emerged in particular historical moments, and how those literary techniques and strategies both reflect and help to shape individual and collective experience in those periods. This course satisfies the core requirement.

Race, Nation, Borders in American Literature
Professor Gonzalez
21:352:230:01       M/TH 1:00-2:20 pm

This course will explore the literature (poetry, fiction, nonfiction) that places the U.S.-Mexico border at the center of the narrative as a landscape, character, and politicized zone. Students are expected to submit weekly reading responses, a midterm academic term paper, and one take-home final. A few of the angles we will examine during class discussions are the different roles the border plays in shaping personal identity, community, and agency: How do borders separate and unite people and nations? How is the border an experience, a social journey or a state of consciousness? How does the border an international trauma and an empowering force for the populations that inhabit it? How is border a prison? How is it a home?  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Race, Nation, Borders in American Literature
Professor Lomas
21:352:230:Q1       M/W 4:00-5:20 pm

In “Race, Nation and Borders in American Literature,” we study the literary texts of diasporic, native and immigrant groups within and beyond the borders of the United States, in order to see how they reimagine prevailing narratives of American culture. Paying special attention to the legacies of colonization, slavery, internment and migration (forced or otherwise), we read from a range of genres--including autobiography, theatre, poetry, novel, essay, and music. How do Amerindian, African American, Asian American, Latina/o, and other literary traditions respond to the peculiar racial procedures of the U.S.? How has the definition of "white" shifted in order to preserve white privilege and hegemony, and what are characteristics of whiteness as it figures in American literature? How has racism changed over time and how does it relate to categories of class and sex? We will think together about borders not only in a geographic sense, but also as the edges of identity categories such as gender, sexuality, language, race, class, age, and religion. In this writing intensive course, we will make our classroom into a writing workshop as we study the zones of contact that shape literature and culture in the United States and the Americas.  This course satisfies the core requirement.

Special Topics in American Literature: Literature of the American Revolution
Professor Kiniry
21:352:250:01       M/W 10:00-11:20 am

Through the theme of political and personal antagonisms, we look at some classic and not-so-classic texts of the Revolution and its uneasy aftermath. Readings include the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, Thomas Paine's "Common Sense," Joseph Martin's "Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier," Joseph Ellis's "Founding Brothers," J. F. Cooper's "The Spy," and "American Aurora" by Richard Rosenfeld. This course satisfies the core requirement.

American Drama                                              
Professor Miller
21:352:333:01       T/TH 10:00-11:20 am

A survey of American plays in their historical context from early melodramas, romances, and comedies through the modern realistic and expressionistic work of O’Neill, Odets, Anderson, Hellman, Miller, Williams, Albee, Baraka, and others.  In this course we will study a sampling of major American playwrights and focus on how they defined the notion of "realism" on stage and how they tried to expand the potential of the modern theater to accommodate a more elastic view of what that term meant. We will consider selected plays of Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, Clifford Odets, Tennessee Williams, August Wilson, William Inge, Lorraine Hansberry, and Thornton Wilder.

The Novel in American Since 1950
Professor Foley
21:352:364:01      M/W 10:00-11:20 am                        

We shall examine a group of contemporary novels (1975-2015) that grapple with important issues of our time: the exploitation and alienation of labor; racial and gendered oppression; migration and ecological devastation; personal selfhood and social identity. The novels range stylistically­ from realism to postmodernism, linear narrative to fractured point of view. Students will be asked to supplement the novels with short critical and historical readings supplied on Blackboard. The reading list is hefty; students are required to keep up with the assigned text, and pop quizzes will be given frequently. 

 African American Literature to 1900 *Writing Intensive*
Instructor Oliver
21:352:396:Q1      Saturday 9:00-12:15 pm

This writing intensive course examines African American prose -- fiction and non-fiction -- poetry and drama from the mid-20th century through early 21st century. Students will learn time frames, significant intellectual trends; cultural values and literary genres of African American literature of the period studied and understand how selected writers and their works embody significant characteristics of their literary/historical periods.

 

CREATIVE WRITING MINORS 200



Introduction to Creative Writing * Writing Intensive *
Instructor:  Syeed
21:200:201:Q1            M/W 10:00-11:20 am 

Introduction to Creative Writing is a multi-genre course divided into three sections: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. Experience with these forms will ground the student in techniques useful to communicating effectively in many fields, including law, medicine, business, science, technology, and criminal justice. Each unit is based on several reading assignments and one creative written assignment. Methods of presentation of creative work will alternate between class group work; reading aloud; submission to the instructor for written feedback; and discussion with a class partner. At the end of the course students will have a portfolio that may serve as the creative portion of the application to the Creative Writing Minor.

Introduction to Creative Writing * Writing Intensive *
Instructor: Luan
21:200:201:Q2            T/TH 11:30-12:50 pm

Introduction to Creative Writing is a multi-genre course divided into three sections: poetry, creative non-fiction, and fiction. Experience with these forms will ground the student in techniques useful to communicating effectively in many fields, including law, medicine, business, science, technology, and criminal justice. Each unit is based on several reading assignments and one creative written assignment. Methods of presentation of creative work will alternate between class group work; reading aloud; submission to the instructor for written feedback; and discussion with a class partner. At the end of the course students will have a portfolio that may serve as the creative portion of the application to the Creative Writing Minor.

World Forms: Haiku, Ghazal, Sonnet and More *Writing Intensive*
Instructor: Reyes
21:200:313:Q1                        M/W 10:00-11:20 am             

This workshop course is a reading and writing intensive course, studying poetic forms from around the globe.  Students will study the Japanese forms Haiku and Tanka, including the translated work of Issa and Basho, as well as contemporary Haiku practitioners. The Ghazal, celebrated Persian form, will be studied through the translated poems of Hafiz and Agha Shahid Ali’s work in English.  Other forms, such as the Pantoum (originally Malayan) and Terza Rima (originally Italian), have been absorbed by 19th and 20th century poets within the English-language tradition.  The course will also explore such English-language mainstays of poetry as the Villanelle, the Sestina and the Sonnet, ancient forms such as the abcedarian and Sapphics, and contemporary forms such as the erasure poem. Students will write one poem per week towards a final portfolio of twelve poems, the completion of which will count as the final exam.  Course requirements include discussion of the readings, group work, in-class writing, and take-home writing assignments.

Basic of Craft: A Writier’s Toolbox * Writing Intensive *
Instructor: Wong
21:200:321                  Mon. 2:30-3:50 pm Wed. 1:00-2:20 pm

This course is a reading and writing intensive course covering the major craft elements in narrative fiction; structure, plot, character, description, setting, point of view, theme, voice, and more. The course is based on the textbook, Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft by Janet Burroway and Ned Stuckey-French. Each week students will either:

 1) Read a chapter from the text and do exercises to practice the craft element presented

2) Read stories in the book, discuss, and do exercises requiring discernment of technique

This basic introduction will provide students with a basis for writing stories and reading as a writer. Students will practice giving each other feedback based in a common language. Gaining a mutual understanding of the terms used to critique a story is an important course goal.   Another important component of this course is to introduce students to the habits of writing. Students will keep a writing notebook with sections devoted to vocabulary, work habits, ideas, and photocopies of techniques they want to practice and learn. The functions of drafts and revisions will be discussed. Authors read include Annie Dillard, Joyce Carol Oates, Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, Jamaica Kincaid, Alice Munro, Raymond Carver.

Writers at Newark I * Writing Intensive *
Instructor: Lima
21:352:208:Q1            T/TH 2:30-3:50 pm

The objectives of this course, based each semester on the books of the writers featured in the Writers At Newark Reading Series, are to diversify our understanding of contemporary American writing in fiction and poetry, and to explore the development of personal identity in the books of prominent writers who work to sculpt individualized voices within a framework of multiplicitous American identities. Students have the unique opportunity to attend readings by the visiting writers at monthly readings and Q&As. Completion of this course requires attendance at all 4 (Tuesday, 5:30 p.m.) readings. See www.ncas.rutgers.edu/mfa for Writers At Newark schedule and writer bios.