Course Syllabus - 910:341: Social Welfare Policies Through 1930s

Rutgers University – Newark
History of Social Welfare Policies & Programs to 1930’s
21:910:341
 
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COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course is for students who are interested in major social issues related to social welfare and how society developed responses to them.  This course is a requirement for social work majors.  The historical, economic, and theoretical foundations of American social welfare policies will be explored.  The focus is on what has happened to the general and specific subsets of the population at different periods of time by exploring the history and development of American social welfare policies.  This includes attitudes towards vulnerable populations, values, public and private programs and the profession of social work and its values from the 1600s through the Progressive Era and 1920s.  The interplay of values, traditions, politics, economics, and social changes that occurred in society and produced the responses to social needs and social problems will be examined.  Ecological systems, problem solving and historical structural frameworks will be the basis of analysis.  Particular attention will be given to developing the student’s critical thinking abilities by exploring the role of social movements and the developing profession and values of social work in changing and impacting social policy and programs.  Relevance for what is happening today will be explored.
 
COURSE PREREQUISITES:
The course is open to any student, but is required for social work majors.  Successful completion of a writing course or competency exam is required.  All students must have taken and passed English 101 and 102.
 
WRITING INTENSIVE:
As designated by the Rutgers-Newark Writing across the Curriculum Committee, this course has been selected as a “writing intensive course.”  Therefore, students should be cognizant of the writing expectations for the course: substantial writing, multiple writing assignments, revisions of work, and receipt of critical feedback.  These criteria are designed to improve students’ writing and their ability to convey their thoughts in a clear, coherent manner.
(Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: Effective written and oral communication)
 
Course Competencies:
 
Rutgers University - Newark Undergraduate Learning Objectives:
  • Effective Written and Oral Communication: Graduates should be able develop arguments in clear and coherent written texts, based on research, and they should also be able to express themselves clearly and intelligently in public speaking.
  • Critical and Creative Thinking: Students should be educated to think both critically, with the analytical skill of evaluating arguments and information, and creatively, with the ability to create ideas, processes, experiences, objects or texts.
  • An Understanding of Intercultural Relations: Graduates should possess some proficiency in a language other than
  • Diversity: Our campus is defined by its diversity, and as pedagogy, content, and mode of analysis, diversity should be structured into all of our offerings where possible.
  • An Ability to Address Major Questions of Our Time: Students should graduate with the ability to employ research, moral reasoning and informed analysis to address defining social, political, cultural and scientific questions of their time in contemporary and historical perspectives.
Council on Social Work Core Competencies: This course is designed for the student to gain further knowledge and competence in the following core social work competencies:  
  • Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments (EP 2.1.3) by applying problem solving methods to and critically analyzing historical and current social issues and policies. (Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: Critical and creative thinking)
  • Engage diversity and difference in practice (EP 2.1.4) and Advance human rights and social and economic justice (EP 2.1.5) by:
    • Learning about the effects of social welfare policies and programs on the most vulnerable segments of the population (EP 2.14, 2.1.5); and,
    • Identifying particular needs, policies, and program developments related to vulnerable populations (EP 4, 5) 

(Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: An understanding of Intercultural Relations and An ability to address major questions of our time)

  • Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services (EP 2.1.8) and respond to contexts that shape practice (EP 2.1.9) by:
    • Learning how pre-1930s social policies and programs developed, changed, and contributed to issues of social justice (EP 2.1.8, 2.1.9);
    • Learning about the political, organizational, and theoretical constructs that contributed to issues of social welfare (EP 2.1.8, 2.1.9);
    • Learning about how different types of societies responded to human need and vulnerable populations over time (EP 2.1.9);
    • Learning about the economic, social, and historical factors that influenced the treatment of different groups of people at specific points in history (EP 2.1.8, 2.1.9);
    • Learning about the function of social welfare organizations in implementing welfare policies (EP 2.1.8, 2.1.9);
    • Exploring future policy possibilities and developing constructs for potential change (EP 2.1.9); and,
    • Learning how to organize and articulate thoughts and knowledge through written reports with regards to social welfare policy (EP 2.1.8)
  • Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice (EP 2.1.2) by:
    • Increasing knowledge of social welfare policy as related to the NASW Code of Ethics (EP 2.1.2, 2.1.8) ; and,
    • Identifying social work values and social workers’ responsibilities and possibilities for effecting positive change and resisting negative change in policy and programs on macro, mezzo, and micro levels (EP 2.1.2, 2.1.8, 2.1.9)

After taking this course, the student will demonstrate mastery of course competencies and be able to:

  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication (EP 2.1.1)
  • Make ethical decisions by applying standards of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics (EP 2.1.2)
  • Apply strategies of ethical reasoning to arrive at principled decisions (EP 2.1.2)                               
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate interventions (EP 2.1.2)
  • Demonstrate effective oral and written communication in analyzing social welfare policies with regards to working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, and colleagues (EP 2.1.3) (Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: Effective written and oral communication)
  • Recognize the extent to which a culture's structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create or enhance privilege and power (EP 2.1.4) (Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: An understanding of Intercultural Relations)
  • Understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination (EP 2.1.5) (Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: An ability to address major questions of our time)
  • Advocate for human rights and social and economic justice (EP 2.1.5) (Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: An ability to address major questions of our time)
  • Engage in practices that advance social and economic justice (EP 2.1.5) (Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: An ability to address major questions of our time)
  • Analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being (EP 2.1.8) (Also satisfies FASN Core Undergraduate Learning Objectives: An ability to address major questions of our time)
  • Continuously discover, appraise, and attend to changing locales, populations, scientific and technological developments, and emerging societal trends to provide relevant services (EP 2.1.9)

REQUIRED TEXTS: 

Eric Foner, A Short History of Reconstruction, Harper Row, NY, 1990
 
David Wagner, The Poorhouse: America’s Forgotten Institution, Rowman & Littlefield, Boulder, CO, 2005
 
ADDITIONAL READINGS:
Readings are on electronic reserve.  The readings can be accessed using:
1) The “Course Readings” tab on the classroom blackboard site
You can search for the readings using the instructors’ last name, course name, or course number.
 
SUPPLEMENTAL RESOURCE MATERIALS:
Lenore T. Szuchman & Barbara Thomlison, Writing With Style: APA Style For Social Work (4th Ed.), Brooks/Cole, CA, 2011, 2008
 
TEXTING, CELLPHONES, and INTERNET POLICY:       
In today’s technologically oriented society, students are connected to their cell phones more than ever; however, texting, checking Facebook accounts, checking your twitter account, etc. is not allowed in class. Additionally, as part of showing respect to your colleagues in the class, please put all cell phones and other gadgets that make any kind of sound on either silent or vibrate before class starts.  If students feel that they cannot be disconnected from their cell phones during class sessions, please feel free to handle your business outside. 
        
SPECIAL NEEDS:
As stated in the Manual for Students and Coordinators of Services for Students with Disabilities (http://disabilityservices.rutgers.edu/docs/studentmanual.pdf), Rutgers University “is committed to providing equal education opportunity for persons with disabilities in accordance with the Nondiscrimination Policy of the University and in compliance with § 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.”  For students with disabilities, review the manual and contact Genevieve Sumski, the Student Disability Coordinator, or her assistant, Jason Khurdan at 973/353-5300.  Both Genevieve and Jason are located in room #352 in the Robeson Campus Center.
 
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COUNSELING SERVICES:
If you experience psychological or other difficulties as a result of this course, or because of other issues that may interfere with your performance in the course, please contact the university’s psychological and counseling service center (http://www.counseling.newark.rutgers.edu; 973/353-5805), which is located in Blumenthal Hall, room #101.  The center offers a variety of free, confidential services to part-time and full-time students who are enrolled at Rutgers.
 
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
Students are expected to adhere to the University’s Policy on Academic Honesty.  Please pay special attention and follow proper protocol with regard to citations and documentation of reports.  The Department of Social Work takes plagiarism/cheating very seriously for both academic and professional reasons.  If not resolved within the Department, issues of plagiarism/cheating will be reported to the Dean of Student Affairs Office and may be grounds for dismissal from the major and/or the college.  Please review and familiarize yourself with the SW Student Handbook on Rutgers University Newark SW website (http://www.ncas.rutgers.edu/socialwork).  Students are responsible for knowing the information therein, including student’s rights, grievance process and dismissal from the program procedures. Written assignments will be submitted to SafeAssign to check for plagiarism.
 
CLASS ATTENDANCE:
Attendance and participation are important aspects of this course. The assignments are based on the readings and one’s interpretation of the material and participation in class discussion allows for a deeper understanding of the topics. Consistent absences and/or tardiness hinder the learning process for you and your fellow students. Therefore, attendance and participation are required. It is understandable that students might, for a number of reasons, occasionally be absent from class; however, please be aware of the following policies:
1.  

4 to 7 absences will adversely impact your final grade, lowering it by one grade (i.e., a B+ will drop to a B; a B will drop to a C+, etc.).

2. 8+ absences will result in a failing grade for the course
3. 3 late arrivals or early departures will be counted as one absence; and,
4. Anyone missing 30 minutes or more of a class will be marked absent for that day
 
Attendance will be taken each class and it is your responsibility to sign-in, no exceptions. 
 
CLASS PARTICIPATION:
Student participation is key to a lively class. Given that, students are encouraged to ask and answer questions, become involved in classroom discussions, and participate in group projects.  RESPECT for one another regardless of whether you agree or believe in your classmates’ stated opinions is the expected rule.
 
5% of your final course grade is based on contributions to class discussions.  Class participation provides the opportunity to practice speaking and persuasive skills, as well as the ability to listen.  It is important for students to contribute to class discussions.
Outstanding Participation (18-25 points):  Contributions in class reflect thorough preparation.  Ideas offered are substantive and provide one or more major insights as well as direction for the class.  Information is well substantiated and persuasively presented.
Good/Adequate Participation (10-17 points):  Contributions in class reflect satisfactory preparation.  Ideas offered are sometimes substantive, provide generally useful insights but seldom offer a new direction for the discussion.  Information is fairly well substantiated and is sometimes persuasive.
Unsatisfactory Participation (1-9 points):  Student says little in class and contributions reflect inadequate preparation.  Comments offered are seldom substantive or constructive and provide few, if any, insights.
 
BLACKBOARD COURSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM:
This course utilizes Blackboard and in order to access Blackboard you must have an active university computer account on Pegasus or Andromeda.  Once registered on Blackboard you may change from your account to the email address you use regularly but continue to check Blackboard daily for course announcements and syllabus updates.  Given that all electronic correspondence for this class will be through Blackboard, it is your responsibility to keep your email account updated and accurate on Blackboard and to stay aware of any classroom postings and/or announcements.  All assignments are to be posted to Blackboard.
 
COURSE ASSIGNMENTS:
All assignments must be submitted via the “Assignment” link located on Blackboard on the scheduled due date and by the designated time. Assignments are to be typed, double spaced and checked for clarity/conciseness of written thoughts, spelling, grammar, and sentence structure. Assignments not submitted on the due date and by the designated time will be reduced three percent (3%) for each day the assignment is late (i.e., for a 50 point assignment, 1.5 points will be deducted per day it is late).  No assignments later than 2 weeks will be accepted. 
 
REACTION PAPERS (3 out of 4 due)
You are responsible for submitting 3 out of 4 reaction papers based on Course readings.  These reaction 2-page papers are to be typed and double-spaced. The following should be addressed:

I.      What concept is being addressed?

II.     What is the perspective of the author(s)?

III.    How does this article(s)/chapter(s) relate to social welfare policies?

IV.    What is your opinion about the Social Problem/Social Issue/Concept discussed in the reading(s)?

These assignments are due before class on the dates indicated on the class schedule.
Assignment meets CSWE Core Competencies: 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.8
Assignment meets FASN Learning Objectives: Effective Written and Oral Communication; Critical and Creative Thinking; An Understanding of Intercultural Relations; An Ability to Address Major Questions of Our Time. 
 
THE JUNGLE PAPER:
Choose an issue or social problem and a major or minor character from The Jungle and write a three (3) page paper (your coversheet and reference page are not included in the three pages) addressing the following:
 
1. Introduce your issue or social problem as it relates to your chosen character; make sure to include a thesis statement (in other words – tell the reader what claim/argument you’ll be making in the paper and what the reader can expect from the rest of the paper),
2. Provide background information on your issue or social problem and chosen character,
3. What impact did the issue/social problem have on chosen character,
4. Expound on the moral compass of the time; highlighting the interplay of values, traditions, politics, economics, and/or social changes, and
5. Include a paragraph stating the importance of your issue or social problem and its correlation to your chosen character to social workers.
 
 
Papers must be submitted via the “Assignment” link locate on Blackboard on/or before 10:00 pm on Wednesday, 11/05/14.  Papers must be in APA format and are to be typed, double spaced, and checked for spelling, grammar, punctuation, and syntax.  
Assignment meets CSWE Core Competencies: 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, 2.1.8
Assignment meets FASN Learning Objectives: Effective Written and Oral Communication; Critical and Creative Thinking; An Understanding of Intercultural Relations; An Ability to Address Major Questions of Our Time. 
 
POLICY RESEARCH PAPER:
Students will be required to write a 5 page persuasive research paper that expands on a historical content area (e.g., Black Suffrage, Immigration, Reconstruction/Reconstruction Amendments, The Poor Laws, The Progressive Era, Women’s Suffrage Movement) and relates the historical struggle to current events. The paper should be in APA format, and checked for spelling, grammar, punctuation, and syntax.
Assignment meets CSWE Core Competencies: 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, 2.1.8. 
Assignment meets FASN Learning Objectives: Effective Written and Oral Communication; Critical and Creative Thinking; An Understanding of Intercultural Relations; An Ability to Address Major Questions of Our Time
 
Your policy research paper should include all of the following numbered/bolded questions (you do not need, and may not be able, to answer all the sub-points listed under each of the main sections - use them as a guide):
1)  What is your thesis statement – what is your argument and what do you want your reader to understand when they are done reading the paper?
 
 2) What is the social problem? 
How did the problem become recognized or legitimized? 
Who was affected by the problem and how?
Which groups defined or controlled the definition of the problem?  Did this change over time?
Whose values and interests seemed to be significant?
What was the role of economics in the social problem?                             
How widespread was the problem?
  What were the causes of the problem?
  How important was this problem historically?
 
3) What was the policy / social response / social movement that affected the social problem?  
When and how did the policy/social response/social movement originate (e.g., law, court decision, executive order, etc.). 
Who advocated for, supported, the policy / social response / social movement?
Who opposed the policy / social response / social movement?
Why was the policy / social response / social movement created?
How was the policy / social response / social movement intended to work?
Who was covered by the policy / social response / social movement and what were the inclusion criteria?
What were the intended short and long-term goals and outcomes of the policy / social response / social movement?
Were there hidden agendas? 
Did the policy / social response / social movement threaten fundamental social values? 
Was the policy / social response / social movement compatible with the social/political/economic climate of the time?
What was the general public opinion toward the policy / social response / social movement?
Who benefited from the policy / social response / social movement?
Who (if anyone or any group) was ‘hurt’ by the policy / social response / social movement?
Did the policy / social response / social movement accomplish its goals? 
Were there any negative consequences related to the policy / social response / social movement?
Were there alternative policy / social response / social movement that would have been preferable?
What role did social work play in the development of the policy / social response / social movement?
 
4) What is the current state of this historical social problem?
        Does this social problem still exist?
        What is different about the social problem today?
        Is the population impacted by the social problem different?
        What values underlie the social problem today? Are they different from the values of the past?
        What are the current policy / social responses / social movements that are related to this social problem?
 
Grading Criteria:

-         

23% Grammar

-         

23% References/APA format

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53% Content (did you answer the questions?) and depth of your argument/analysis

 
POLICY RESEARCH PAPER TIMETABLE:
 
Topic and Brief Synopsis: Due via the “Assignment” link located on Blackboard on/or before 10:00 pm Wednesday, 9/24/14.  1page
 
  • Choose a historical social issue/social problem that occurred prior to the 1930s
  • Brief synopsis of  social issue/problem and societal response (i.e., policy, social movement, etc.)
  • Reason for choosing social issue/problem
  • Briefly discuss the targeted population with respect to your chosen social issue/problem
  • State your thesis (Do some critical thinking and write your thesis statement down in one sentence).  Note: State your thesis and the purpose of your research paper clearly.  What is the chief reason you are writing the paper? What do you hope to learn and what do you hope your reader will learn?
 
Annotated Bibliography: Due via the “Assignment” link located on Blackboard on/or before 10:00 pm on Monday, 10/27/14.  2 – 3 pages in APA format
 
  • Literature to be used  - minimum of seven (7) references - NO WIKIPEDIA SOURCES
  • Brief Summary of each reference.  Include a 1-paragraph description of each reference
  • References must be approved before being utilized in your final paper
  • All internet sources MUST be pre-approved before incorporation into your final paper (Any sources not pre-approved will  not count towards the 7 required references).
 
Final Paper: Due via the “Assignment” link located on Blackboard on/or before 10:00 pm on Thursday, 12/11/14.
 
GROUP BOOK PRESENTATIONS
Each student will be assigned a group (1-6) and each group will be responsible for presenting on designated chapters in “A Short History of Reconstruction,” “A Century of Struggle,” or “The Poorhouse: America’s Forgotten Institution” on the assigned datesEach group presentation will be 35 minutes (25 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for questions/answers).
Group Presentation (25 points):

o   

Each group must submit their PowerPoint presentation and an outline indicating member roles and 1 to 2 questions for the class 1-day prior to the presentation

o   

Each member must submit a Self-Assessment form the day of the presentation

Classroom participation (25 points):

o   

Each student must submit 2 questions about the readings to be used during the question/answer period

o   

Students must submit the Group Assessment forms on the day of the presentation

 
Assignment meets CSWE Core Competencies: 2.2.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, 2.1.8
      Assignment meets FASN Learning Objectives: Effective Written and Oral Communication; Critical and Creative Thinking; An Understanding of Intercultural Relations; An Ability to Address Major Questions of Our Time.

EXAMS

 

There will be three exams worth 50 points each throughout the semester on the assigned readings and classroom discussion. The format will be multiple choice and short answer.  Late Exams: You must contact me to address the missed exam before or the day of the scheduled exam, there will be a 15% reduction in points for the make-up exam, and the make-up exam must be taken by the first class following the originally scheduled exam.
Assignment meets CSWE Core Competencies: 2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3, 2.1.4, 2.1.5, 2.1.8
Assignment meets FASN Learning Objectives: Effective Written and Oral Communication; Critical and Creative Thinking; An Understanding of Intercultural Relations; An Ability to Address Major Questions of Our Time.
 
EXTRA CREDIT (up to 10 points or 2 percentage pts): You can choose 1 of 3 opportunities
#1: Ellis Island Field Trip: There will be an optional field trip to visit Ellis Island on Saturday, November 08, 2014. We will meet at Liberty State Park (Jersey City) at 9:15am to prepare to board the ferry to the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island.  There are two security check points: (i) prior to boarding the ferry, and (ii) before we enter the Ellis Island Museum.  The cost of the ticket is $18.00 and will be due in class on/or before Thursday (10/2).  To receive up to 10 extra credit points, students must submit a one page reaction paper critically analyzing the information received as it relates to the topics discussed in class.  Papers must be in APA format, typed, double spaced, and checked for spelling, grammar, punctuation, and syntax. 
#2: Tenement Museum (NYC): Visit the Tenement House Museum in New York City

-      

You should participate in one of three tours:

o   

Hard Times (Who can you turn to for help?):

See how life at 97 Orchard Street differed for a German-Jewish family in the 1870s and a Sicilian-Catholic family during the 1930s.  As students explore the Gumpertz and Baldizzi apartments, they learn how families cope with hard times and who they can turn to for help.

o   

Irish Outsiders (What is it like to be an outsider?):

Experience the immigrant saga through the music of Irish America.  Visit the 1869 home of the Moores, Irish immigrants coping with the death of a child and explore issues of discrimination, healthcare, and discrimination.

o   

Sweatshop Workers (How does your job affect your life?):

Visit the homes of two Jewish families who lived at 97 Orchard Street during the great wave of immigration.  Learn about the jobs the Levine and Rogarshevsky families found in the garment industry and how work influences family's home, cultural traditions, and social lives.

-      

Submit your ticket stub and a 2-page reaction paper

OR
#3: Write an extra 2-page reaction paper
MEANS OF EVALUATING STUDENTS:
Class Participation / Attendance                        25 points (5%)
Group Presentations                                              50 points (10 %)
      Group Presentation (25pts)
      Group/Self-Assessment/Questions (25pts)
Reaction Papers (30 pts each)                         90 points (18%)
The Jungle Paper                                                   75 points (15%)
Policy Paper                                            110 points (22%)
      Topic (10pts)                                                   
      Annotated Bibliography (10pts)                  
      Final Paper (90pts)                                         
Exams I-III (50pts each)                                     150 points (30%)
Total                                                                        500 points
 
GRADING SCALE:
A     =  100% - 93%       (500-465 pts.)           
B+   =  92 - 85%             (464- 424 pts.)            
B     =  84 - 79%             (423– 395 pts.)           
C+   =  78 - 75%             (394 – 375 pts.)        
C     =  74 - 69%             (374 – 345 pts.)        
D     =  68 - 60%             (344 – 300 pts.)        
F     =  59% and below  (299 pts. or below)
 
Temporary (“T”) grades will only be considered under extreme circumstances and with the Instructor’s prior agreement.  Discussion with the Instructor regarding any concerns related to the course and/or difficulties the student may be having is encouraged and should occur early in the semester.