Senior Research Fellows

Senior Research Fellows

Ishmael Beah Ishmael Beah was born in Sierra Leone in 1980. He moved to the United States in 1998 and finished his last two years of high school at the United Nations International School in New York. In 2004 he graduated from Oberlin College with a B.A. in political science. He is a member of the Human Rights Watch Children’s Rights Division Advisory Committee and has spoken before the United Nations, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Center for Emerging Threats and Opportunities (CETO) at the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, and many other NGO panels on children affected by the war. His work has appeared in VespertinePress and LIT magazine. He lives in New York City.
Youk Chhang Youk Chhang is the Executive Director of the Documentation Center of Cambodia (DC-Cam) and a genocide survivor of the Khmer Rouge's "killing fields."  DC-Cam grew out of Yale University's Cambodian Genocide Program (CGP) to conduct research, training and documentation relating to the Khmer Rouge regime. The CGP founded DC-Cam as a field office in Phnom Penh in 1995 under Mr. Chhang's leadership. He continued to run the Center after its inception as an independent Cambodian NGO in 1997.  Prior to the establishment of DC-Cam, Mr. Chhang managed and led political, human rights and democracy training programs in Cambodia on democratic institutions for the International Republican Institute (IRI). He was also associated with the Electoral Component of the United Nations Transitional Administration in Cambodia (UNTAC). From 1989 to 1992 he worked on crime prevention in the City of Dallas, Texas, USA.  He received the Truman-Reagan Freedom Award from the Victims of Communism Memorial Foundation in Washington, DC in 2000. He was also named one of Time magazine's "60 Asian heroes" in 2006 and one of the "Time 100" most influential people in the world in 2007 for his stand against impunity in Cambodia and elsewhere.

Previous Senior Research Fellows

Bernardo Kliksberg Bernardo Kliksberg is an Argentine economist (of Jewish-Polish descent), known for his work on poverty and inequality in Latin America, social management and corporate social responsibility. He currently serves as Chief Advisor to the Regional Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Director of the Spain-UNDP Trust Fund "Towards an integrated and inclusive development in Latin America and the Caribbean". Kliksberg is the author of 48 books and hundreds of papers on various areas of development, corporate social responsibility, top management, social capital, the fight against poverty, ethics and economics. His most recent work is the international bestseller "The People First", coauthored with the Nobel Prize Laureate in Economics Amartya Sen. He has advised more than 30 countries and institutions such as the UN, UNESCO, UNICEF, the International Labour Organization, the Organization of American States and the Pan American Health Organization, among others. Bernardo Kliksberg has been married to Ana Kaul since 1973. They have three children and three grandchildren. He was born in Buenos Aires and currently lives in New York.
Jack McLean Jack McLean was born in Huntington, New York and brought up on Summit, New Jersey, where he lived until admittance to Phillips Academy, Andover, at age fourteen. Upon graduation, McLean enlisted in the United States Marine Corp. After boot scamp and a year on stateside duty, he served in Vietnam with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division. McLean returned to enter Harvard in the fall of 1968 as the college’s first Vietnam veteran. After graduation, he held marketing positions in New York, Boston, Portland, Maine, Charlotte, North Carolina, and Washington, D.C. McLean is the father of three daughters and is currently the Tsien Writer in Residence in Fort Lee, New Jersey. He will join CGCHR as a Senior Research Fellow in the Spring of 2011. His bestselling book, Loon: A Marine Story, was published by Presidio in 2009.
Arthur Romano Arthur Romano is a certified nonviolence trainer and accomplished international educator committed to transforming violence and promoting social justice. He works with communities globally to build durable relationships and institutions that facilitate peace-learning. He is currently a Senior Research Fellow at Rutgers-Newark and works with the National Peace Academy and the Institute for Juvenile Justice Reform and Alternatives. Arthur began his work as a youth organizer and at the age of 21 founded the International Youth for Peace Program which grew to attract participants in more than 15 countries. Over the last decade he has worked with tens of thousands of people offering programs on nonviolent leadership, interfaith dialogue and creative approaches to social change. In 2004, he was awarded the prestigious Rotary World Peace Fellowship for the study of conflict resolution and during that time he conducted research in India and Japan and worked with the Scottish Parliament implementing a strategy that advanced peace education efforts nationally.